Dec 01 2017

December 01, 2017Author: JasperNo Comments

A new trailer has arrived for one of Anton’s final films, Thoroughbreds, which hits theaters on March 9, 2018. I have also added screencaps from the trailer into the gallery.

Nov 16 2017

November 16, 2017Author: JasperNo Comments

Check out this feature article on Porto from MovieMaker magazine, which delves into the filmmaking procedure done for the film.

Porto is a love letter to the timelessness of great cinema. Director Gabe Klinger is a scholar of cinema history, and he was keen to invoke the textures and traditions of older films and filmmakers for this project.

The story didn’t have to be told in Portugal, but it had to take place in an old city that was lost in time. Depending on where you turn a camera, the city of Porto can transport you to any decade or century, and this was essential in creating a feeling of drifting through time and history. It was also essential to Gabe and I that we shoot on film (as opposed to digital), because film has a way of distancing the image from the present.

The film is about two people on separate paths that intersect for one cataclysmic night in a foreign city. We wanted Porto to evoke both the feeling of time passing throughout their lives, and of events happening in the present, and we worked with a variety of film formats to achieve this. Super 8mm was used for the more fleeting memories throughout their lives, almost like home movies. Super 16mm was our verité format, used to document the important events in their lives leading up to and following their night together. We used 35mm for a more formal real-time feel to show the encounter itself, unfiltered by time and memory. Initially these were to be separate chapters, but in the edit they were integrated to strike more connections between the past, present, and memory.

For the 8mm footage, we tested a half dozen cameras and settled on three different consumer models which slowly fell apart as the shoot progressed. We developed our tests with a hand-processor in Porto, something that we were very excited about initially, but the results were too unstable. In the end we sent our final films to ColorCity, a lab in Paris that at the time was still processing color reversal.

For the Super 16mm, we were watching a lot of direct cinema and verité films, and we were determined to get into the minimal, essential headspace of those filmmakers as much as possible. We even looked into reviving the sound-on-film cameras Robert Drew and associates were using, like, the Auricon, which scribbled the location audio directly onto the camera negative with a pulsing, shuttered light. Ultimately we decided that if those filmmakers were shooting today, they’d be using the lightest and most liberating 16mm cameras, and it was more important to honor their intention than to reanimate the technology. We used an Arri 416 for all the handheld and long-lens scenes following the two lead protagonists, Mati (Lucie Lucas) and Jake (Anton Yelchin), through their solitary existences. After filming several of these scenes, I found I was having a hard time falling into step with Anton. At last, he revealed that he had been honing a nearly imperceptible limp in his right foot for the role, as though Jake had been injured in his youth but hadn’t healed properly. I just had to learn the limp, and from then on we were in perfect sync! Anton was extraordinarily immersed in the role, even limiting his diet to local junk food like “Francesinhas” (meat and cheese sandwiches that are typical in the region) the entire time we were in Portugal, true to his character, who at one point in the film tell us that he doesn’t take care of himself.

For the scenes that take place in real-time the night of the encounter, Gabe wanted to jump up to 35mm ‘Scope to make it feel grander and more immersive, as the evening is experienced for Jake and Mati. We wanted it to feel less dated than the other material, so we shot with cleaner lenses (Cooke-S4s) and designed all of the scenes as single shots or series of shots with as little coverage as possible. Even the lovemaking scenes were designed to feel continuous and unyielding, unlike many love scenes which are minced together from a variety of angles in order to feel discreet. We did, however, shoot them very dark, keying two and a half stops under and filling three stops under from the key side, which veiled them in grain and rendered them in simpler forms, so that the nudity was not awkward and distracting.

The thing I love most about shooting film is that it removes everyone from the immediate results. With digital, you’re constantly seeing how the image will be rendered, which takes you out of the moment. When I look through an optical viewfinder and hear film whirring through the gate, I become totally tuned into the event happening in front of the camera, which is the essence of filmmaking. Each take is a unique event which cannot be repeated. An actor cannot do the same thing twice. This is true with digital, but somehow it’s easily forgotten. Seeing the picture on a monitor makes you think you can refine it endlessly, and that the final, flattened image is most important. It’s not. Good directors can maintain that immediacy and intimacy of the event when working with digital systems, but with film cameras it is inherent in the technology. This is why so many films we love from the last century feel so spontaneous and “raw.”

For us, it’s not about the aesthetic qualities of film (though those help); it’s the way film changes the process. With Porto, Anton and Gabe wanted to get back to this kind of filmmaking, which embraces chance and acknowledges that a movie can never be made the same way twice; that it is a product of who you cast and work with, and where and when you shoot. Thousands of factors influence the events that happen in front of the camera, and it becomes a cultural and historical artifact as soon as it is captured. Unfortunately, with Anton’s passing, this philosophy became even more real for Gabe and I. We’re very grateful to have the film as a recollection of our time with him.

Tech Box

Cameras: Arri 416 and Arricam Studio and Arri LT

Lenses: Zeiss Ultra16s and Cooke S4s

Film: Kodak 7219, Kodak 5219, Kodak Ektachrome and Fuji Velvia MM

Nov 15 2017

November 15, 2017Author: JasperNo Comments

One of Anton’s final films, Porto is set to be released in New York City this Friday, November 17th, in Landmark Sunshine Cinema, and will run until November 23rd. Visit this link for details and for booking advanced tickets! After that, the film will be shown in Los Angeles, California starting on November 24th to 30th in Landmark Nuart Theatre. For more info and for tickets for the LA run, visit this link. Check out high-quality images in our gallery and the official trailer below! Also, keep an eye out (if you’re not yet following us) on our Twitter for some more goodies as we approach and during the film release. All thanks to Kino Lorber, the distributor of the film.


Oct 11 2017

The first official trailer of Thoroughbreds has just been released. The film is one of Anton’s final projects, and also stars Anya Taylor-Joy and Olivia Cooke. I have also added screencaps of the trailer into the gallery.

Oct 07 2017

A batch of official images from one of Anton’s final films, Thoroughbreds, has been released, including a few production stills and an official poster. The first trailer is expected to be dropped next week. The film premiered at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival last January, and is set for a March 9, 2018 release.

Childhood friends Lily and Amanda reconnect in suburban Connecticut after years of growing apart. Lily has turned into a polished, upper-class teenager, with a fancy boarding school on her transcript and a coveted internship on her resume; Amanda has developed a sharp wit and her own particular attitude, but all in the process of becoming a social outcast. Though they initially seem completely at odds, the pair bond over Lily’s contempt for her oppressive stepfather, Mark, and as their friendship grows, they begin to bring out one another’s most destructive tendencies. Their ambitions lead them to hire a local hustler, Tim, and take matters into their own hands to set their lives straight.

Aug 16 2017

Check out the first official trailer for one of Anton’s final projects, Rememory. The film will be out in theaters on September 8th, and on Google Play on August 24th.

The film explores the unexplained death of Gordon Dunn (Martin Donovan), a visionary scientific pioneer whose body is found shortly after the unveiling of his newest work: a device able to extract, record and play a person’s memories. Gordon’s wife, Carolyn (Julia Ormond – Mad Men, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Legends of the Fall), retreats into her house and cuts off contact with the outside world when a mysterious man (Peter Dinklage – Game of Thrones, X-Men: Days of Future Past, The Station Agent) shows up. After stealing the machine, he uses it to try and solve the mystery, beginning an investigation of memories that lead him to unexpected and dangerous places.

Apr 04 2017

Yahoo Movies shared an exclusive clip from one of Anton’s final films, We Don’t Belong Here. The film is out on DVD and Digital today.

Mar 11 2017

Kino Lorber has acquired North American rights to Porto, the Gabe Klinger-directed film starring Anton Yelchin and Lucie Lucas. The deal comes as the pic shot in the Portuguese city preps for its North American premiere Sunday at SXSW. The pic is screening in 35mm in Austin, and Kino Lorber is planning a fall theatrical release with a commitment to show the film both on 35mm and digital before a winter VOD bow.

It’s one of the final film roles for Yelchin, who died last June in a freak car accident. He plays Jake, who along with Mati (Lucas) are outsiders in the northerly Portuguese city of Porto who once experienced a brief but intimate connection. He’s an American loner exiled from his family; she’s a French student abroad with her professor lover. One day they see each other from a distance at an archeological site and then again at a train station and a café, where Jake works up the courage to speak to her for the first time, and they embark on a night of carefree intimacy. The experience is looked at years later, both of them still haunted by the powerful moments they shared.

Source: Deadline