Oct 30 2018

HOLLYWOOD REPORTER – Two years after Star Trek actor Anton Yelchin’s death, the Anton Yelchin Foundation has donated $1 million to the University of Southern California’s adult cystic fibrosis center at Keck Hospital, which has been renamed the Anton Yelchin Cystic Fibrosis Clinic at Keck Hospital of USC.

Before Yelchin died in a motor vehicle accident in 2016, the hospital administered treatment to him for 10 years as he battled cystic fibrosis. The clinic on Wednesday held a commemorative ceremony attended by Yelchin’s parents, the hospital’s cystic fibrosis unit and the Anton Yelchin Foundation’s board of directors to honor Yelchin and thank the foundation for its contribution.

“The staff at the cystic fibrosis clinic was like a family to Anton,” said Yelchin’s mother, Irina Yelchin. “He worked hard and was dedicated to living a healthy life. When he needed assistance, they were always there for him.”

Irina, along with her husband Victor Yelchin, created the foundation in honor of their son after he died. Victor serves as the foundation’s CEO and board president. Earlier this year, Yelchin’s parents reached a settlement with Fiat Chrysler, the makers of the SUV that crushed and killed the actor in his driveway.

“Anton had a generous spirit,” said Victor. “This gift not only reflects our gratitude to the clinic but also Anton’s dedication to helping others.”

Helmed by A. Purush Rao, clinical associate professor of medicine of the Keck School of Medicine at USC, the Anton Yelchin Cystic Fibrosis Clinic aids cystic fibrosis patients transitioning from pediatric to adult treatment.

Said Irina, “Because of Anton’s strong will and the dedication of the cystic fibrosis team at USC, he lived an exceptional, productive life.”

Apr 28 2018

Last year, it was announced that the third chapter of Trollhunters will be the last of the adventure series. Now, Netflix has added in three new cast members, including Orphan Black star Tatiana Maslany, and Narcos star Diego Luna. The third addition is Emile Hirsch, who will be taking over the role of Jim Lake, Jr., originally voiced by Anton. Here are some more details per Deadline:

Maslany and Luna will voice Aja and Krel, two mysterious new students who unknowingly come to the aid of the Trollhunters team in the fight against Morgana. The duo will also reprise their roles and serve as the leads of the next installment in the Tales of Arcadia trilogy, DreamWorks 3 Below, set to debut on Netflix later this year.

Hirsch takes on the role of Jim Lake, Jr., originally voiced by the late Anton Yelchin. Yelchin completed his work on the first two seasons and a considerable portion of season three before his unexpected passing in 2016. Del Toro and his creative team found a unique way to incorporate a voice transition organic to the story and create a path for Hirsch, a dear friend of Yelchin’s ,to carry on his legacy and role. Yelchin’s performance has been left intact where possible and some portions have been merged with Hirsch’s performance to complete season three, according to Netflix and DreamWorks.

In DreamWorks Trollhunters Part 3 the fate of troll and human civilizations hang in the balance. The Trollhunters are racing to stop Gunmar and the now resurrected Morgana from bringing about the Eternal Night and shrouding the world in darkness forever. To defeat them, the team must seek the help of the legendary wizard Merlin to unlock his ancient magic and unleash a powerful weapon that will alter the course of their lives forever.

Dec 15 2017

December 15, 2017Author: Jasper2 Comments

Anton’s family and friends came together at the opening night of Anton Yelchin: Provocative Beauty, an exhibit that features photos from Anton’s six-year photography work, at De Buck Gallery in Los Angeles last December 13th. Kristen Stewart (from Fierce People), Ben Foster (Alpha Dog), Bryce Dallas Howard (Terminator: Salvation) were among his co-stars that were there to support. The exhibit will run until January 20th.

Dec 13 2017

Ahead of the Part 2 premiere on Friday, December 15th, Netflix has announced that Trollhunters is headed to new adventures with a third and final chapter! It is slated to premiere next year.

“Trollhunters” (Part 3) and “3 Below” (Second installment of Tales of Arcadia Trilogy)
“Trollhunters” Part 2, from Guillermo del Toro, premieres on Netflix, on Friday, Dec. 15, with a third and final chapter of the Emmy-winning series set to debut in 2018. “3 Below,” the second series in the previously announced Tales of Arcadia trilogy, will premiere in late 2018 and feature two royal teenage aliens and their bodyguard who flee a surprise takeover of their home planet by an evil dictator and crash land in Arcadia. Now on the run from intergalactic bounty hunters, they struggle to blend in and adapt to the bizarre world of high school all the while attempting to repair their ship so they can return and defend their home planet. A final chapter, “Wizards,” is set to debut in 2019. “Trollhunters” was created and executive produced by Guillermo del Toro with Marc Guggenheim, Rodrigo Blaas, Chad Hammes, and Christina Steinberg also serving as executive producers. Dan Hageman and Kevin Hageman serve as co-executive producers.

Dec 01 2017

A new trailer has arrived for one of Anton’s final films, Thoroughbreds, which hits theaters on March 9, 2018. I have also added screencaps from the trailer into the gallery.

Nov 21 2017

November 21, 2017Author: Jasper2 Comments

Last year, there was an exhibit that showcased Anton’s photography in Los Angeles. This time, it’s New York’s turn. De Buck Gallery will be hosting the exhibit, which features 54 photos from Anton’s six-year photography work. The exhibit will open on December 13th and will run until January 20th. For more details and the gallery address, visit the De Buck Gallery’s website!

NEW YORK—De Buck Gallery is pleased to present Anton Yelchin: Provocative Beauty. The exhibition will open Wednesday, December 13, 2017 and will remain open until Saturday, January 20, 2018. The selection of 54 mages spans from a productive 6-year period of photographic exploration.

At the time of his tragic passing at the age of 27, unbeknownst to most of his friends, Anton was pursuing a second career as a photographer. During this period, he documented a wide range of subjects using a Leica camera as well as disposable cameras. This exhibition focuses on portraits, self-portraits and interior images that Anton captured while exploring this private world. These photos include many intimate portraits of friends, family and also complete strangers. All of these people trusted Anton to convey his intimate interactions with them.

Anton was known primarily for his work as an actor in films such as Star Trek, Green Room, Like Crazy, Terminator: Salvation, Alpha Dog and many more. Yelchin’s career began as a child when he received rolls in Curb Your EnthusiasmThe Practice, Hearts in Atlantis, Delivering Milo, and ER. Passionate about photography since childhood, Yelchin was embarking on a second career as a photographer at the end of his short but beautifully-lived life, having been commissioned to shoot for a number of international publications.

De Buck Gallery wishes to honor the legacy of Anton Yelchin’s life and to recognize the tremendous creative energy, output and talent that he possessed.

The artist’s portion of proceeds from sales will be donated to the Anton Yelchin Foundation. These funds will be used for a variety of programs empowering artists who face career challenges due to debilitating disease or disability.

The exhibition is co-curated by Clayton Calvert and Rachel Vancelette.

Nov 16 2017

Check out this feature article on Porto from MovieMaker magazine, which delves into the filmmaking procedure done for the film.

Porto is a love letter to the timelessness of great cinema. Director Gabe Klinger is a scholar of cinema history, and he was keen to invoke the textures and traditions of older films and filmmakers for this project.

The story didn’t have to be told in Portugal, but it had to take place in an old city that was lost in time. Depending on where you turn a camera, the city of Porto can transport you to any decade or century, and this was essential in creating a feeling of drifting through time and history. It was also essential to Gabe and I that we shoot on film (as opposed to digital), because film has a way of distancing the image from the present.

The film is about two people on separate paths that intersect for one cataclysmic night in a foreign city. We wanted Porto to evoke both the feeling of time passing throughout their lives, and of events happening in the present, and we worked with a variety of film formats to achieve this. Super 8mm was used for the more fleeting memories throughout their lives, almost like home movies. Super 16mm was our verité format, used to document the important events in their lives leading up to and following their night together. We used 35mm for a more formal real-time feel to show the encounter itself, unfiltered by time and memory. Initially these were to be separate chapters, but in the edit they were integrated to strike more connections between the past, present, and memory.

For the 8mm footage, we tested a half dozen cameras and settled on three different consumer models which slowly fell apart as the shoot progressed. We developed our tests with a hand-processor in Porto, something that we were very excited about initially, but the results were too unstable. In the end we sent our final films to ColorCity, a lab in Paris that at the time was still processing color reversal.

For the Super 16mm, we were watching a lot of direct cinema and verité films, and we were determined to get into the minimal, essential headspace of those filmmakers as much as possible. We even looked into reviving the sound-on-film cameras Robert Drew and associates were using, like, the Auricon, which scribbled the location audio directly onto the camera negative with a pulsing, shuttered light. Ultimately we decided that if those filmmakers were shooting today, they’d be using the lightest and most liberating 16mm cameras, and it was more important to honor their intention than to reanimate the technology. We used an Arri 416 for all the handheld and long-lens scenes following the two lead protagonists, Mati (Lucie Lucas) and Jake (Anton Yelchin), through their solitary existences. After filming several of these scenes, I found I was having a hard time falling into step with Anton. At last, he revealed that he had been honing a nearly imperceptible limp in his right foot for the role, as though Jake had been injured in his youth but hadn’t healed properly. I just had to learn the limp, and from then on we were in perfect sync! Anton was extraordinarily immersed in the role, even limiting his diet to local junk food like “Francesinhas” (meat and cheese sandwiches that are typical in the region) the entire time we were in Portugal, true to his character, who at one point in the film tell us that he doesn’t take care of himself.

For the scenes that take place in real-time the night of the encounter, Gabe wanted to jump up to 35mm ‘Scope to make it feel grander and more immersive, as the evening is experienced for Jake and Mati. We wanted it to feel less dated than the other material, so we shot with cleaner lenses (Cooke-S4s) and designed all of the scenes as single shots or series of shots with as little coverage as possible. Even the lovemaking scenes were designed to feel continuous and unyielding, unlike many love scenes which are minced together from a variety of angles in order to feel discreet. We did, however, shoot them very dark, keying two and a half stops under and filling three stops under from the key side, which veiled them in grain and rendered them in simpler forms, so that the nudity was not awkward and distracting.

The thing I love most about shooting film is that it removes everyone from the immediate results. With digital, you’re constantly seeing how the image will be rendered, which takes you out of the moment. When I look through an optical viewfinder and hear film whirring through the gate, I become totally tuned into the event happening in front of the camera, which is the essence of filmmaking. Each take is a unique event which cannot be repeated. An actor cannot do the same thing twice. This is true with digital, but somehow it’s easily forgotten. Seeing the picture on a monitor makes you think you can refine it endlessly, and that the final, flattened image is most important. It’s not. Good directors can maintain that immediacy and intimacy of the event when working with digital systems, but with film cameras it is inherent in the technology. This is why so many films we love from the last century feel so spontaneous and “raw.”

For us, it’s not about the aesthetic qualities of film (though those help); it’s the way film changes the process. With Porto, Anton and Gabe wanted to get back to this kind of filmmaking, which embraces chance and acknowledges that a movie can never be made the same way twice; that it is a product of who you cast and work with, and where and when you shoot. Thousands of factors influence the events that happen in front of the camera, and it becomes a cultural and historical artifact as soon as it is captured. Unfortunately, with Anton’s passing, this philosophy became even more real for Gabe and I. We’re very grateful to have the film as a recollection of our time with him.

Tech Box

Cameras: Arri 416 and Arricam Studio and Arri LT

Lenses: Zeiss Ultra16s and Cooke S4s

Film: Kodak 7219, Kodak 5219, Kodak Ektachrome and Fuji Velvia MM

Nov 15 2017

One of Anton’s final films, Porto is set to be released in New York City this Friday, November 17th, in Landmark Sunshine Cinema, and will run until November 23rd. Visit this link for details and for booking advanced tickets! After that, the film will be shown in Los Angeles, California starting on November 24th to 30th in Landmark Nuart Theatre. For more info and for tickets for the LA run, visit this link. Check out high-quality images in our gallery and the official trailer below! Also, keep an eye out (if you’re not yet following us) on our Twitter for some more goodies as we approach and during the film release. All thanks to Kino Lorber, the distributor of the film.